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Opinion Writing Worksheets: How to Teach Opinion Writing to Kindergarteners?

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How to Teach Kindergarteners to Write Opinions

Looking for strategies to educate Kindergarteners how to write their opinions? We’ve devised a step-by-step procedure for getting your Kinders to communicate their thoughts in no time. There’s also a free printable for your class to use.

Kinders, as we all know, have strong feelings about practically everything. At the drop of a hat, they’ll tell you exactly how they feel about something. There are times when I wish I could be as liberated as that. As educators, it is our responsibility to channel that natural desire. We get to teach kids how to express themselves and write opinions.

Students must learn how to write convincingly about an opinion. To begin, children must understand that their words count and that what they have to say is significant. Every person’s opinion matters, which might become a sort of mantra. Most importantly, instilling in them the ability to express themselves is a skill that will endure a lifetime.

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Kindergarten Opinion Writing

Kindergarten pupils are required to voice their opinion (or preference) on specific themes or books. This will be accomplished by a combination of drawing, dictation, and writing. In a nutshell, we’re asking them to:

  • Consider a subject and make an opinion. (How do they feel about it?)
  • Find a cause to support their beliefs. (What makes them believe that?)
  • Those thoughts should be drawn and written down. (Let others know what you think.)
  • While it may be simple for Kinders to express themselves vocally, writing things down is a different story. As a result, we’ll walk you through a four-step procedure to get you from point A to point B.

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What Is Opinion Writing, and How Does It Differ from Other Types of Writing?

Students can express their preferences through opinion writing. Also, explain why you’re keeping it. They will soon realize that they must back up their claims with facts. But for the time being, we’re just attempting to teach them to speak in a logical manner.

We’ll also begin to introduce language related to opinion writing. We say things like “the best,” “I believe,” “I prefer,” and “because.”

How Do You Teach Kindergarteners to Write Opinions?

These which one opinion writing pages are a great way for kindergarten students to practice their beginning writing skills and share their thinking. There are 33+ different options, each with three differentiated levels included. These no-prep opinion writing pages can be used as a whole group activity, in writing centers, or as part of a small group lesson.  This resource includes:  33+ different opinion options (100+ pages total). 3 differentiated versions of response sheets An optional writing journal/folder front covers Students will learn to share their opinions using phrases such as I like, I prefer, I would rather, the best, more than.  Themes include food, community helpers, sports, animals, seasonal activities, hobbies, school subjects, and places.  There are three differentiated versions of the opinion writing pages, which means this activity will grow with your students throughout the year. You can also use these different levels to differentiate the activities.  Level 1 – This version is a great introduction to an opinion writing unit. Students will write their choice to write the sentences and then draw a picture to match in the space provided below.  Level 2 – A sentence starter is provided for students to write their choice, and then extend their writing by giving a reason to support their answer.  Level 3 – Students are given blank writing lines for a free write response. Additional free-writing templates are provided for students who are ready to write more.  Blank pages are provided at the end to print for those who want to write more.

When teaching Kindergarten students to write their opinions, it’s important to take things slow and steady.

We begin by providing several opportunities for our kids to express themselves.

The day’s question

To begin, you could ask the day’s question. Questions like as these:

  • On a snowy day, what is the finest thing to do?
  • Which hat should be placed on top of the snowman?
  • Do you like hot chocolate with marshmallows or without?
  • What is the title of your favorite book?

Another option is to say something along the lines of, “Skating is the best thing to do in the winter!” Invite your students to express their opinions (or not). Invite them to explain why they believe what they believe, but don’t be concerned if they are unable to do so at first.

Take pleasure in the subsequent debates. It could be interesting to record the answers and produce graphs as an aside.

Using literature as a jumping off point

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Second, when you’re reading a narrative, ask them for their thoughts on a character’s actions or emotions. Inquire about what they would do in that situation if they were that character.

Teacher tip:
At this point, try to avoid agreeing with or disputing your students’ ideas. We aim to help kids feel more at ease when it comes to voicing their ideas.

Reading books that express opinions can be beneficial. Then give students the opportunity to answer. Here are a few ideas to get you started.

Teacher Tip:

Explain to your pupils that everyone has an opinion, but not everyone agrees. It’s fine that we all have diverse tastes. Everyone’s viewpoint is important.

Transitioning from Speaking to Writing

These which one opinion writing pages are a great way for kindergarten students to practice their beginning writing skills and share their thinking. There are 33+ different options, each with three differentiated levels included. These no-prep opinion writing pages can be used as a whole group activity, in writing centers, or as part of a small group lesson.  This resource includes:  33+ different opinion options (100+ pages total). 3 differentiated versions of response sheets An optional writing journal/folder front covers Students will learn to share their opinions using phrases such as I like, I prefer, I would rather, the best, more than.  Themes include food, community helpers, sports, animals, seasonal activities, hobbies, school subjects, and places.  There are three differentiated versions of the opinion writing pages, which means this activity will grow with your students throughout the year. You can also use these different levels to differentiate the activities.  Level 1 – This version is a great introduction to an opinion writing unit. Students will write their choice to write the sentences and then draw a picture to match in the space provided below.  Level 2 – A sentence starter is provided for students to write their choice, and then extend their writing by giving a reason to support their answer.  Level 3 – Students are given blank writing lines for a free write response. Additional free-writing templates are provided for students who are ready to write more.  Blank pages are provided at the end to print for those who want to write more.

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Hopefully, students will feel more at ease expressing their views. Then you can start teaching them how to express themselves in writing.

With this in mind, we’ve prepared a free printable that will walk you through the steps of the procedure. That’s something you’ll want to get right now.

What is in the Free Printable?

These ”which one opinion writing pages” are a great way for kindergarten students to practice their beginning writing skills and share their thinking. There are 6 different options, each with three differentiated levels included. These no-prep opinion writing pages can be used as a whole group activity, in writing centers, or as part of a small group lesson.

This free resource includes:

  • 6 different opinion options (9- pages total).
  • 3 differentiated versions of response sheets
  • An optional writing journal/folder front covers

Students will learn to share their opinions using phrases such as I like, I prefer, I would rather, the best, more than.

Themes include food, community helpers, sports, animals, seasonal activities, hobbies, school subjects, and places.

There are three differentiated versions of the opinion writing pages, which means this activity will grow with your students throughout the year. You can also use these different levels to differentiate the activities.

Level 1 – This version is a great introduction to an opinion writing unit. Students will write their choice to write the sentences and then draw a picture to match in the space provided below.

Level 2 – A sentence starter is provided for students to write their choice, and then extend their writing by giving a reason to support their answer.

Level 3 – Students are given blank writing lines for a free write response. Additional free-writing templates are provided for students who are ready to write more.

Blank pages are provided at the end to print for those who want to write more.

worksheets for teachers life insurance and loans finance credits

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